Who can oppose a grant of probate?

oppose a grant of probate, contest a will, legal interest, deceased estate, beneficiary, personal property, legacy, bequest

Not just anyone can oppose a grant of probate, or contest the validity of a will.  You must have what the law calls “standing“.  And you only have standing (or locus standi) to oppose a probate application or contest the validity of a will if you have a legal interest in the estate of a deceased person. 

Further, it is important to be able to show that the interest is enough so as to entitle you to oppose the grant of probate being applied for; and so have standing to bring an action disputing the validity of the will. 

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Personal items or chattels in a deceased estate

personal items, personal effects, belongings, deceased estate, will, willmaking, testator, personal thingsPersonal items otherwise referred to as chattels in deceased estates can have important sentimental value.  They may be family heirlooms passed down to keep within the family, with unique stories to tell.  Personal items may have little commercial value, or maybe of significant monetary worth in the case of jewellery, antiques, artworks and the like.

What might “personal items” mean in succession law?  What happens if you don’t leave any instructions as to who takes your personal things and you die intestate? Who is entitled under the law to take your personal items then?  More