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Contesting a will – time limits on making an application

time limits, family provision, family provision law, farm, Western Australia, contest a will, Time limits apply under family provision law within which to contest or challenge a will. If this time has passed it is possible to apply to the Court for an extension, but whether it is granted will depend on the circumstances. In this case the application was unsuccessful, being some years out of time.

Severing a joint tenancy unilaterally

Many couples own their home together as joint tenants under a joint tenancy.  Under a joint tenancy an important legal consequence to remember with this type of property co-ownership is the legal right of survivorship. The right of survivorship means that when the first owner dies, their interest in the property is automatically absorbed so that …

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Intestacy rules – who is entitled to inherit?

AdelaideIf you die without leaving a will you are said to die “intestate”. In the absence of instructions left in a valid will, who will inherit your property? Succession law contains strict rules to deal with this problem.

Pets – making provision for their care by will

pets, cats, wills, WillsHub,provision for petsPets are family but arrangements may not always be made for what to do with a beloved pet when their owner is no longer around.  It is helpful to executors to consider leaving arrangements on what to do.

A will is a useful way make provision for the care and maintenance of companion animals.  Various options are available, depending on individual circumstances.

Update a will to avoid unintended outcomes

Updating a will might seem a troublesome chore, but circumstances can change from the time it was made. The changes might produce unintended and unwanted outcomes in the event of death. Therefore reviewing a will is important to keep its contents in line with intentions.  Regularly reviewing your will is important so it reflects your intentions.

Why make a will and what can a will do?

why make a will, make a will, making a will, dying without a will, intestateWhy make a will and what can it do?Why make a will and what can it do? Dying without leaving a will, or leaving an invalid one, is to die intestate. Dying intestate means property left (the estate) is distributed according to the intestacy law. The intestacy law has been prescribed by legislation as the ‘default’ rules to apply in these circumstances. The problem is that the intestacy formula for distribution may not produce the desired outcome.

What is a will?

A will is a testamentary document

A will is a testamentary document, often referred to by lawyers as an ‘instrument’, setting out what a person intends to have happen to their property, (real and personal), and other matters, when they die.  It is the legal way to record a person’s instructions and wishes on how they want their property distributed on the event of their death, and who is to responsible for carrying out those wishes.  Because it is to take effect only on death, a will is referred to as being ‘testamentary’.  A testamentary document or instrument is one which its writer intends, at the time of writing it, to come into effect when they die, and not before. It is where a person sets out their intentions for the distribution of their property when they die.

Tenancy & co-ownership: jointly owned or in common?

Co-ownership, joint tenancy, tenants in commonMany people own property with someone else. An important issue to consider upfront are what happens when one of them dies. Who can take their interest, is this what they want and if not, can they make provision for it in their will?