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children in wills

Home made will – a good idea?

A home made will is one prepared by the willmaker themselves, perhaps using a “will kit” and without without the services of a lawyer and the benefit of individual legal advice. This may seem an economical and convenient approach to will-making.  While a lawyer’s costs are avoided at this step, there is the  potential is …

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Stepchild contesting a step-parent’s will – Queensland

stepchild, willshub, step-parent, family provision, In a Queensland case a stepchild was left out of the will of a step-parent. He subsequently sought provision from his step-mother’s estate. She had no natural children of her own. Her husband, the applicant’s father, had pre-deceased her. The applicant was her only step-child. In another situation a claim was brought by seven step-children for adequate provision out of their deceased stepmother’s estate.

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Illegitimate children, ex-nuptial children – can they inherit?

illegitimate children, ex-nuptial children, contest a will, challenge a will, inheritance, inheritIllegitimate children are those born outside of marriage, or out of wedlock, in older terminology.  These days the word “illegitimate” has largely been replaced in law by the term “ex-nuptial” – nuptial referring to marriage.  Either way, can an ex-nuptial child inherit from their natural parents?  Or contest a natural parent’s will for provision out of their estate? What if no will was left?  

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Updating a will to avoid unintended outcomes

 

Updating a will might seem a troublesome chore, but circumstances can change from the time it was made. The changes might produce unintended and unwanted outcomes in the event of death. Therefore reviewing a will is important to keep its contents in line with intentions.  Regularly reviewing your will is important so it reflects your intentions.

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Who can make a will?

 

Who can make a will to dispose of their property? Who can make a will? To make a will a person must be an adult and have the required mental capacity.

A will made by a minor, being under 18, is generally invalid under State and Territory wills and succession legislation.

Exceptions relate to contemplation of marriage, or altering or cancelling a prior will. If the contemplated marriage does not take place, the will is invalid. The court may authorise a minor to make, alter or cancel a will.

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