“Contrary intention” in succession law and will-making

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Contrary intention are words used in Australian succession legislation on wills and the administration of deceased estates. Some examples are given below of the range of matters where the law allows for a willmaker to express a contrary intention in their will to the statutory rule.

Where a provision of succession legislation contains these words, it means that the statutory rule can be displaced, that is not apply in the administration of their estate, if a willmaker has expressed a different intention on the matter in their will as to what they want to have happen.  A contrary intention may be expressed in a will or appear in a will.

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Gortyn laws – ancient inheritance laws etched in stone

The Great Inscription at Gortyn on the Island of Crete, Greece

Ancient inheritance law, Law code of Gortyn, inscription, law in stone, Ancient inheritance laws etched in stone walls

Some of the earliest known written inheritance and succession laws can be found at the archaeological site of Gortyn, on the southern side of the island of Crete, Greece.  Gortyn, Gortys or Gortyna was once a large, busy metropolis in Ancient Greece.
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