Severing a joint tenancy unilaterally

joint tenants, tenancy, death, severing a joint tenancy, co-ownership, dies, inheritance, succession, WillsHub
Many couples own their home together as joint tenants under a joint tenancy.  Under a joint tenancy an important legal consequence to remember with this type of property co-ownership is the legal right of survivorship.

The right of survivorship means that when the first owner dies, their interest in the property is automatically absorbed so that the surviving owner now owns the whole property, see graphic. This is due to the operation of law and is independent of a will.

When the survivor dies, the property then passes according to their will, or if no will left, according to the intestacy rules. For people co-owning property as joint tenants, it is therefore important to review their situations and wills on a regular basis to ensure outcomes on death are what is wanted.


Update a will to avoid unintended outcomes


By B Stead

Why update a will?

Updating a will might seem a troublesome chore, but circumstances can change from the time it was made.  The changes might produce unintended and unwanted outcomes in the event of death.  Therefore reviewing a will is important to keep its contents in line with intentions.

Regularly reviewing your will every few years or so, in light of changes in your life, is worth doing, as life events and matters such as those outlined below can affect a will.  Everyone’s situation is different so in all cases seek professional legal advice from a solicitor providing services in this area.


Joint tenancy or tenancy in common – considerations for inheritance and will-making

Joint tenancy and tenancy in common give different outcomes when an owner dies

Joint tenancy and tenancy in common are ways of owning property with others. Each works differently when an owner dies, see graphic below.  This impacts who will inherit the deceased owner’s share.  These graphics seek to highlight how each tenancy works.

In a joint tenancy, when one owner dies, the surviving one automatically owns the whole property.  This happens independently of any will (and probate) because of the right of survivorship attaching to this tenancy type.


Co-ownership & tenancy: jointly owned or in common?

By: B Stead

Co-ownership, joint tenancy, tenants in commonMany people own property with another person in a co-ownership arrangement.  Spouses or partners typically own their residence together in joint names, family members; or  friends may own a property together for investment.

An important issue to consider upfront when buying property are the consequences of when a co-owner dies. How the property is owned between people, that is, its tenancy, can give very different outcomes on death.  Ideally these should be considered at the time of purchase.

Questions to ask include who can take a co-owner’s interest when they die?  Would this be what they want to have happen?  If not, can they state their intention in their will? Or is the property owned in a way that on death the interest automatically passes to the survivor/s outside of a will, as in joint tenancy?  This article looks at tenancy issues.  More